Category Archives: survival

A practical and economical knife for anyone

Kershaw burst review

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Whether it’s in your pocket, your glove box, tool box, or bug out bag a good knife is an indispensable and potentially life saving tool. I wanted to do a quick review on my new pocket knife I got for Christmas. As an everyday enthusiast I am always excited to try a new product that could potentially save a life, or just make everyday tasks easier.

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My first reaction to this Kershaw burst was the blade. It has a stonewashed finish and is made of 8Cr13MoV stainless steel.

According to wiki:
8CR13MoV A Chinese stainless steel tempered at the Rc56 to Rc58 range and used in Spyderco’s, Kershaw’s, and other quality knife maker’s budget lines of knives. For example, Kershaw’s Crown II is one of the few “name brand steel” folders that can be had for under $20 (in 2013). 8CR13MoV is often talked about in terms of a high-end budget steel. Early Byrd (the Spyderco budget line) 8CR13MoV knives were marked 440C, but tests found that the steel was something entirely different from American 440C. According to Sal Glesser, owner of Spyderco, this steel was closer to AUS-8 (AUS8) than American 440C.[32] 8CR13MoV is often compared to AUS-8 and 440C,[33] but it has slightly more Carbon.

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I usually go with a tanto style yet this knife has a beautiful blade nonetheless. It comes with or without the serrated edge and has what appears to be a notch or finger hold for skinning or filleting. (Looks like a notch for blood letting to me) It specifically states in the packaging not for stabbing yet I get the impression it would do the job. The blade is sharp right out of the box as it should be. It’s speed safe assisted opening is tight fast and easy to operate. It takes a little muscle on the flipper to get it going but watch out its fast! The blade makes a loud snap when opening which is good for dramatic effect yet not always ideal in real life situations. There is no play in it when up and locked which is really nice. The handle is made of injection molded glass filled nylon and feels a bit light and plasticky but has a subtle design that adds a nice grip and feel to it. Over all it is balanced fairly well considering how light the handle feels. The clip is super tight fitting to the point of making it hard to clip and unclip however I prefer it that way as I have been known to lose a blade a time or two in the past. Either way that isn’t that big of a concern to me considering it could be bent out a little bit to accommodate. When it is clipped it reminds me of a lighter in my fifth pocket. The clip can also be moved to the opposite side for lefties yet is limited to the butt side of the knife only. It’s blade measures 3″ and the overall knife measures 4 1/8″ when closed.

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I’ve had the opportunity to use it a few times now and it has cut brilliantly thus far. There isn’t much negative I have to say about it yet. We will have to wait and see how well it holds up over time. It being a Kershaw though I assume it will be well worth the $20.00 – $30.00 it retails for.

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I give it an overall rating of 7/10. I wanted to give it an eight but in all fairness, while it is a decent looking, fairly well made, balanced, and comfortable knife, it just doesn’t have the feel or look of a pocket knife that will withstand years of abuse and still be worth a damn like my grandpas original old timers. The bottom line is I would still definitely recommend it. For the price of a case or two of beer (depending on what you drink) you can have yourself a decent knife at a great value.

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